Resident Crews of the International Space Station (ISS)

ISS: Expedition 69

ISS Project Patch

hi res version (510 KB)

Patch ISS-69 Crew ISS-69

hi res version (629 KB)

hi res version (1.31 MB)

crew poster

Patch Dragon SpX-28 (SpaceX) Patch Dragon SpX-28 (NASA)
Patch Cygnus NG-19 (Northrop) Patch Cygnus NG-19 (NASA)

hi res version (409 KB)

Crew, launch- and landing data

No. Nation Surname Given names Position Spacecraft
(launch)
Launch
date
Launch
time
Spacecraft
(landing)
Landing
date
Landing
time
Mission
duration
Orbits
1  Prokopyev  Sergei Valerievich  ISS-CDR  Soyuz MS-22  21.09.2022  13:54:49.531 UTC  Soyuz MS-23  27.09.2023  11:17:09 UTC 370d 21h 22m 20s  5936 
2  Petelin  Dmitri Aleksandrovich  Flight Engineer-1  Soyuz MS-22  21.09.2022  13:54:49.531 UTC  Soyuz MS-23  27.09.2023  11:17:09 UTC 370d 21h 22m 20s  5936 
3  Rubio  Francisco Carlos "Frank"  Flight Engineer-2  Soyuz MS-22  21.09.2022  13:54:49.531 UTC  Soyuz MS-23  27.09.2023  11:17:09 UTC 370d 21h 22m 20s  5936 
4  Bowen  Stephen Gerard  Flight Engineer-3  SpaceX Crew-6  02.03.2023  05:34:14 UTC  SpaceX Crew-6  04.09.2023  04:17 UTC 185d 22h 42m 46s  2976 
5  Hoburg  Warren Woodrow "Woody"  Flight Engineer-4  SpaceX Crew-6  02.03.2023  05:34:14 UTC  SpaceX Crew-6  04.09.2023  04:17 UTC 185d 22h 42m 46s  2976 
6 UAE  Al Neyadi  Sultan Saif Muftah Hamad  Flight Engineer-5  SpaceX Crew-6  02.03.2023  05:34:14 UTC  SpaceX Crew-6  04.09.2023  04:17 UTC 185d 22h 42m 46s  2976 
7  Fedyayev  Andrei Valerievich  Flight Engineer-6  SpaceX Crew-6  02.03.2023  05:34:14 UTC  SpaceX Crew-6  04.09.2023  04:17 UTC 185d 22h 42m 46s  2976 
8  Moghbeli  Jasmin  Flight Engineer-7  SpaceX Crew-7  26.08.2023  07:27:27 UTC  (SpaceX Crew-7)  (??.03.2024)  UTC

 
9 Denmark  Mogensen  Andreas Enevold  Flight Engineer-8  SpaceX Crew-7  26.08.2023  07:27:27 UTC  (SpaceX Crew-7)  (??.03.2024)  UTC

 
10 Japan  Furukawa  Satoshi  Flight Engineer-9  SpaceX Crew-7  26.08.2023  07:27:27 UTC  (SpaceX Crew-7)  (??.03.2024)  UTC

 
11  Borisov  Konstantin Sergeyevich  Flight Engineer-10  SpaceX Crew-7  26.08.2023  07:27:27 UTC  (SpaceX Crew-7)  (??.03.2024)  UTC

 
12  Kononenko  Oleg Dmitriyevich  Flight Engineer-11  Soyuz MS-24  15.09.2023  15:44:35.417 UTC  (Soyuz MS-25)  (??.09.2024)  UTC

 
13  Chub  Nikolai Aleksandrovich  Flight Engineer-12  Soyuz MS-24  15.09.2023  15:44:35.417 UTC  (Soyuz MS-25)  (??.09.2024)  UTC

 
14  O'Hara  Loral Ashley  Flight Engineer-13  Soyuz MS-24  15.09.2023  15:44:35.417 UTC  (Soyuz MS-24)  (??.03.2024)  UTC

 

Where is the ISS now?

Expedition Report

With undocking of unmanned Soyuz MS-22 on March 28, 2023 at 09:57:27 UTC the ISS Expedition 68 concluded and the new Expedition 69 began. Soyuz MS-22 landed a few hours later at 11:45 UTC.

On April 06, 2023, the manned spacecraft Soyuz MS-23 was transferred from the Poisk research module to the Prichal module. The maneuver was performed manually by Sergei Prokopyev, together with him Dmitri Petelin and Francisco Rubio flew in the ship.
The Soyuz MS-23 move was carried out to ensure the safety of spacewalks under the Russian program from the Poisk module.
Several EVAs by Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin are planned for spring and summer 2023, the main task of which is to complete the integration of the multipurpose laboratory module Nauka into the Russian segment of the ISS. In particular, the module will be equipped with an additional radiant heat exchanger and an airlock, which will be transferred to the Nauka module from the small research module Rassvet with the European gripper arm ERA, piloted by Andrei Fedyayev.

On April 15, 2023 at 15:05 UTC the unmanned freighter Dragon SpX-27 or CRS-27 undocked from the International Space Station and splashed down later this day.
Dragon carried back to Earth approximately 4,300 pounds (1,950 kilograms) of supplies and scientific experiments designed to take advantage of the space station's microgravity environment. Splashing down off the coast of Florida enables quick transportation of the experiments to NASA's Space Station Processing Facility at the agency's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, allowing researchers to collect data with minimal sample exposure to Earth's gravity.
Some of the scientific investigations that Dragon was carrying include:
Space tomato harvest: Samples from the Pick-and-Eat Salad-Crop Productivity, Nutritional Value, and Acceptability to Supplement the International Space Station Food System (Veg-05) experiment will be returning to Earth for analysis. Astronauts grew dwarf tomatoes in the station's Veggie miniature greenhouse and performed three harvests at 90, 97, and 104 days. They froze tomatoes, water samples, and swabs of the growth hardware to examine the effects of light quality and fertilizer on fruit production, microbial safety, and nutritional value. The ability to grow plants in space for fresh food and an improved crew living experience is important for future long-duration missions. The hardware could be adapted for use on Earth to provide fresh produce for those without access to gardens and as horticultural therapy for older people and people with disabilities.
Growing higher quality crystals: Hicari, an investigation from JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency), tested a growth method and produced crystals of a silicon-germanium (SiGe) semiconductor using the Japanese Experiment Module-Gradient Heating Furnace (JEM-GHF). This crystal growth method could support development of more efficient solar cells and semiconductor-based electronics. The space-produced crystals are returning to Earth for analysis.
Analyzing aging arteries: Astronauts can experience accelerated arterial wall stiffening and thickening after six months in space, and a daily session of aerobic exercise alone may not be sufficient to counteract these effects. Vascular Aging, an investigation from CSA (Canadian Space Agency), monitors these changes using artery ultrasounds, blood samples, glucose tolerance tests, and wearable sensors. Results could help identify and assess risk to astronaut cardiovascular health and point to mechanisms for reducing that risk. For the aging population on Earth, understanding the mechanisms behind arterial stiffness could provide insight to guide prevention and treatment. Blood samples collected for the investigation are returning to Earth for analysis. Fire safety: Solid Fuel Ignition and Extinction - Growth and Extinction Limit (SoFIE-Gel) studies burning in microgravity, including how fuel temperature affects material flammability. The investigation could improve safety of crew members on future missions by increasing understanding of early fire growth behavior, informing selection of fire-resistant spacecraft cabin materials, validating flammability models, and helping to determine optimal fire suppression techniques. Studying flames in space without the complications of buoyancy also helps improve computer models of combustion for terrestrial applications. Gel samples from the investigation are returning to Earth for further analysis.

On April 19, 2023 Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin left the International Space Station through the Poisk module (7h 55m). Main task was to move a radiator from the Rassvet Module and attach it to the Nauka Multipurpose Laboratory Module.

On April 21, 2023 at 11:22 UTC Cygnus NG-18 "SS Sally Ride" was unberthed from Unity nadir docking port released by the SSRMS. Flight controllers on the ground sent commands for the space station's Canadarm2 robotic arm to detach Cygnus from the Unity module's Earth-facing port, then maneuvered the spacecraft into position for its release. Sultan Al Neyadi monitored Cygnus' systems during its departure from the space station. On the same day Cygnus NG-18 "SS Sally Ride" deorbit and reentered the atmosphere.
Cygnus carried more than 8,200 pounds (3,700 kilograms) of supplies, scientific investigations, commercial products, hardware, and other cargo to the orbiting laboratory for NASA.

The first US spacewalk in Expedition 68 performed Stephen Bowen and Sultan Al Neyadi on April 28, 2028 (7h 01m). Main task was to lay cables for the 1A and 1B power channel iROSA upgrades. The astronauts were unable to free up an electronics box located on the truss associated with a degraded S-band communications antenna. The antenna removal was deferred to a future spacewalk ahead of its planned return to Earth.

The second Russian EVA occurred on May 03, 2023 (7h 11m). Sergei Prokopyev and Petelin moved by using the European arm ERA an experiment airlock from the Rassvet Module and attached it to the Nauka Multipurpose Laboratory Module.
Once the equipment airlock was freed of its connections to Rassvet, Andrei Fedyayev worked from inside the station to grab hold of the airlock using the European Robotic Arm (ERA) and then slowly moved it from Rassvet to Nauka. As the 1,800-pound (816.5 kilogram) pressure vessel cleared its previous home, Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin cleaned up its former attach point, removing airlock tie rods and closing out insulation flaps.
Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin then made their way over to Nauka to meet the airlock for its arrival. The two cosmonauts next got into place to help Andrei Fedyayev align the airlock for its attachment to Nauka. With gentle and slow movements, the ERA manipulator brought the airlock into contact with the module, but Andrei Fedyayev could not get the airlock's latches to connect. So, Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin moved in closer and with one on each side of the airlock, grabbed hold of it and held it in place. Only then was Andrei Fedyayev able to use the robotic arm to push the airlock the final way so the hooks could be driven closed.
Finally, they made the power and data connections between the Nauka module and newly-installed airlock. There were six cables needing to be run, with a connector on each side. Some of the connectors' caps were unexpectedly held in place with tape, such that the cosmonauts had to carefully use a knife to cut away the adhesive.

On May 06, 2023, the manned spacecraft SpaceX Crew-6 was transferred from Harmony PMA 3 / IDA-Z to the Harmony PMA 2 / IDA-F.

On May 12, 2023 Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin performed the next Russian EVA (5h 14m). Main task was to deploy a radiator on the Nauka Multipurpose Laboratory Module and attach mechanical, electrical and hydraulic connections.
Following on the footsteps of the latest two successful Russian EVAs (VKD-56 and -57), which installed the missing major elements on Nauka that were launched with Rassvet during STS-131, the experimental airlock and the radiator through the help of ERA, this spacewalk is aim to complete major work on the radiator, by filling it with coolant and deploying it to its working configuration in order to support full heat rejection capability in the Russian section.
The coolant was contained in Nauka's storage tanks as launched, and was transferred through a fluid control panel on its side hull.
As a secondary task, while the radiator fills up, they installed a couple of gap-spanners on ERA's main booms to allow for easier EVA access along the arm.
This EVA should complete the major external configuration changes in the Russian section, in general or until a further expansion takes place, except for future external experiment packages and their support structures.

The unpiloted spacecraft Progress MS-23 launched at 12:56:07.463 UTC on May 24, 2023 on a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The spacecraft carried about three tons of food, fuel, and supplies for the Expedition 69 crew aboard the International Space Station.
The Progress spacecraft was placed into a two-orbit journey to the station, leading to an automatic docking to the Poisk module at 16:18:43 UTC.
The spacecraft will remain at the orbiting laboratory for approximately six months, then undock for a destructive but safe re-entry into Earth's atmosphere to dispose of trash loaded by the crew.

SpaceX's 28th Commercial Resupply Services mission SpX-28 or CRS-28 launched on June 05, 2023 at 15:47 UTC on a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Dragon SpX-28 or CRS-28 carried more than 7,000 pounds (3,000 kg) research, logistics and hardware for the Expeditions 69 and 70. SpaceX's Dragon delivers new science investigations, food, supplies, and equipment for the international crew, including the next pair of iROSAs (International Space Station Roll Out Solar Arrays). These solar panels, which roll out using stored kinetic energy, will expand the energy-production capabilities of the space station. This will be the third set launching in the Dragon Dragon's trunk, and once installed, will help provide a 20% to 30% increase in power for space station research and operations.
Arrival at the station was on June 06, 2023 at 09:54 UTC. The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft docked autonomously to the station's zenith port of the Harmony module. The spacecraft is expected to spend about a month attached to the orbiting outpost before it returns to Earth with research and return cargo, splashing down off the coast of Florida.
The spacecraft also delivered the following:

Thunderstorm Watch: What Happens Above Thunderstorms (Thor-Davis), an investigation from ESA (European Space Agency), will observe thunderstorms from the space station. This vantage point will allow researchers to see the electrical activity from above, particularly the inception, frequency, and altitude of recently discovered blue discharges. Scientists plan to estimate the energy of these phenomena to determine their effect on the atmosphere. A better understanding of lightning and electrical activity in Earth's atmosphere could improve atmospheric models and provide a better understanding of Earth's climate and weather.

Helping Plants Chill in Space: Plants exposed to environmental stress, including spaceflight, undergo changes to adapt, but those changes may not be passed on to the next generation. Plant Habitat-03 (PH-03) will assess whether plants grown in space can transfer such adaptations to the next generation and, if so, whether a change continues through subsequent generations or stabilizes.

Testing a Telomere Technique: Telomeres, genetic structures that protect our chromosomes, shorten with age and wear. But research has shown that telomeres lengthen in space. Genes in Space-10 will test a technique for measuring telomere length in microgravity, where methods typically employed on Earth are difficult to use due to gravity. The experiment will explore whether telomere lengthening in space is caused by proliferation of stem cells -undifferentiated cells that give rise to specific body components and that typically have long telomeres. Understanding the mechanism behind telomere lengthening could reveal possible effects on astronaut health during long-duration missions. Results also could lay the groundwork for a variety of related research to benefit future space travel and people on the ground.
Genes in Space is a national contest for students in grades seven through 12 to design biotechnology experiments for space. The program is sponsored by miniPCR, Math for America, Boeing, New England Biolabs Ltd., and the International Space Station National Laboratory.

Thawing Ice, Solar Storms, and Attitude Recovery: Mission 26 for the station's Nanoracks CubeSat Deployer (NRCSD) includes Educational Space Science and Engineering CubeSat Experiment Mission (ESSENCE), sponsored by the International Space Station National Laboratory and developed by universities in Canada and Australia. It carries a wide-angle camera to monitor thawing of ice and permafrost in the Canadian Arctic, which could provide a better understanding of the effects on Earth's climate and support better local infrastructure planning.
The satellite also carries a solar energetic proton detector to collect data on periods of solar activity that emit highly energized radioactive protons that can damage the structure and electronic components of spacecraft. Understanding these effects could help make future CubeSats more resistant to radiation. In addition, the investigation demonstrates a novel method to recover control of a satellite's attitude, or orientation, if a control mechanism fails. ESSENCE is part of the Canadian CubeSat Project, led by CSA (Canadian Space Agency).

Watching Cosmic Weathering: Iris, sponsored by the International Space Station National Laboratory, observes weathering of geological samples exposed to direct solar and background cosmic radiation and determines whether changes are visually detectable. The investigation also demonstrates experimental sun sensors, torque rods (which provide attitude control and detumbling for satellites), and a battery heater. A collaboration between graduate, undergraduate, and middle school students in Canada, the project provides hands-on experience that promotes interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics studies and careers.

On June 09, 2023 Steven Bowen and Warren Hoburg exited the station's Quest airlock to install an upgraded iROSA (International Space Station Roll-Out Solar Array) on the 1A power channel on the starboard truss of the station (6h 03m).
The new array is 60 feet long by 20 feet wide (18.2 meters by 6 meters) and will shade a little more than half of the original 1A array. Each new iROSA produces more than 20 kilowatts of electricity, and once all are installed, will enable a 30 percent increase in power production over the station's legacy arrays.

On June 15, 2023 Steven Bowen and Warren Hoburg performed the next spacewalk (5h 35m). They installed an iROSA on the 1B power channel on the starboard truss.

The next Russian spacewalk (VKD-59) was performed on June 22, 2023 (6h 24m). The main goal of Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin's work in space was to retrieve several experiment packages and install communications equipment on Zvezda and Poisk modules, and take photos of the external hull of the Zvezda module.

SpaceX Dragon SpX-28 or CRS-28 departed from the International Space Station on June 29, 2023 at 16:30 UTC. Ground controllers at SpaceX in Hawthorne, California, commanded Dragon to undock from the space-facing port of the station's Harmony module and fire its thrusters to move a safe distance away from the station.
Dragon carried back to Earth over 3,600 pounds (1,630 kilograms) of supplies and scientific experiments designed to take advantage of the space station's microgravity environment.
Scientific hardware and samples returning on the mission include the GRIP - Dexterous Manipulation in Microgravity chair used in the ESA (European Space Agency)-sponsored neurology experiments GRIP and GRASP (Gravitational References for Sensimotor Performance: Reaching and Grasping). GRIP studies how microgravity affects the manipulation of objects, while GRASP provides further insight into how the central nervous system adapts to the microgravity environment. The experiments have been on the space station almost six years, and the final in-orbit tests were completed in early 2023.
Samples from BioNutrients-2, Monoclonal Antibodies, and Myotones investigations also returned to Earth for scientific analysis.
After re-entering Earth's atmosphere, the spacecraft made a parachute-assisted splashdown on June 30, 2023 at 14:30 UTC off the coast of Jacksonville Florida. Splashing down off the coast of Florida enables quick transportation of the experiments to NASA's Space Station Processing Facility at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, allowing researchers to collect data with minimal sample exposure to Earth's gravity.

Northrop Grumman launched its 19th resupply mission to the International Space Station on August 02, 2023 at 00:31:17.9 UTC from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island. Loaded with more than 8,200 pounds (3,729 kilograms) of research, crew supplies, and hardware, Northrop Grumman's Cygnus NG-19 cargo spacecraft launched on the company's Antares rocket. The Cygnus spacecrafts dubbed the SS Laurel Clark, a mission specialist aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia for STS-107.
Highlights of space station research facilitated by this mission are:
Testing gene therapy: Neuronix, sponsored by the International Space Station National Laboratory, demonstrates the formation of 3D neuron cell cultures in microgravity and tests a neuron-specific gene therapy.
Experimenting with fire: The sixth Spacecraft Fire Experiments (Saffire-VI) is the last in a series to test flammability at different oxygen levels and to demonstrate fire detection and monitoring as well as post-fire cleanup capabilities. This experiment will take place after the spacecraft has departed the space station.
Measuring atmospheric density: The Multi Needle Langmuir Probe, an investigation from ESA (European Space Agency), monitors plasma densities in the ionosphere - where Earth's atmosphere meets space.
Better water for explorers: A water system launched in fall 2008 provides water for crew consumption and food preparation on the space station. A new system, Exploration PWD, uses advanced water sanitization and microbial growth reduction methods and dispenses hot water.
High-flying art: For I-Space Essay, JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency) is sending a memory card that contains digital works created by students, such as pictures and poetry, to the space station.
Robotic helper: A cube-shaped Astrobee robot is on its way back to the space station to help reduce the amount of time astronauts spend on routine tasks.
Cygnus also will deliver a condensation module and heat transfer system for the Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment that will help researchers better understand heat distribution and flow. Such knowledge could be used to enhance mechanisms that protect astronauts from the extreme hot and cold temperatures of space.
The station's Cold Atom Lab, which makes use of the microgravity environment of space to study quantum phenomena in ways that aren't possible on Earth, will get an upgrade that will give scientists more data in a wider variety of experimental conditions.
The Cygnus spacecraft, dubbed the SS Laurel Clark in honor of the late American Space Shuttle astronaut, arrived at the space station on August 04, 2023. At 09:52 UTC, Woody Hoburg captured Cygnus with the station's robotic arm, and Frank Rubio supported him. After Cygnus capture, mission control in Houston sent ground commands for the station's arm to rotate and install the cargo spacecraft on the Earth-facing port of the station's Unity module.

On August 09, 2023 Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin performed the next Russian spacewalk (6h 35m). Main tasks were to test the relocation of a cosmonaut using the European ERA manipulator. This test was needed to study the sturdiness of a work platform that will be affixed to the end of the European robotic arm. They also installed three debris shields on Rassvet module, where the airlock and radiator were docked.

Progress MS-22 filled with 'junk' and used-up equipment undocked from the International Space Station on August 20, 2023 at 23:50:31 UTC. The unmanned transporter re-entered the atmosphere and burned up over the South Pacific.

The unpiloted spacecraft Progress MS-24 launched at 01:08:10.412 UTC on August 23, 2023 on a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The spacecraft carried about three tons of food, fuel, and supplies for the Expedition 69 crew aboard the International Space Station. The Progress spacecraft was placed into a two-day, 34-orbit journey to the station, leading to an automatic docking to the Zvezda module at 03:45:18 UTC on August 25, 2023.
The spacecraft will remain at the orbiting laboratory for approximately six months, then undock for a destructive but safe re-entry into Earth's atmosphere to dispose of trash loaded by the crew.

SpaceX Crew-7 Endurance docked to Harmony PMA 3 / IDA-Z of the International Space Station on August 27, 2023 at 13:16 UTC. The spacecraft was launched on August 26, 2023 at 07:27:27 UTC. With docking Jasmin Moghbeli, Andreas Mogensen, Satoshi Furukawa and Konstantin Borisov became Flight Engineers of Expedition 69.

On September 03, 2023 SpaceX Crew-6 Endeavour undocked from the International Space Station. With Steven Bowen, Woody Hoburg, Sultan Al Neyadi and Andrei Fedyayev onboard the spacecraft splashed down off the coast of Florida (east of Jacksonville) on September 04, 2023.

Soyuz MS-24 docked to the International Space Station on September 15, 2023 at 18:53:32 UTC following only two orbits. The spacecraft was launched at 15:44:35.417 UTC. With docking Oleg Kononenko, Nikolai Chub and Loral O'Hara became Flight Engineers of Expedition 69.

Finally, the station command changed from Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopyev to Danish astronaut Andreas Mogensen.
ISS Expedition 69 concluded with the undocking of Russian spacecraft Soyuz MS-23 on September 27, 2023 at 07:54:21 UTC.
The landing crew consisted of Sergei Prokopyev, Dmitri Petelin and Frank Rubio. Three-and-a-half-hours later the crew landed safely in Kazakhstan. So, the new Expedition 70 consisted of ISS Commander Andreas Mogensen, Jasmin Moghbeli, Satoshi Furukawa, Konstantin Borisov, Oleg Kononenko, Nikolai Chub and Loral O'Hara.


Among the US experiments are:

Solid Fuel Ignition and Suppression Test: Gravity influences flames on Earth, but in microgravity aboard the space station, fire acts differently and can behave in unexpected ways. Some evidence suggests that fires may be more hazardous in reduced gravity, a safety concern for future space missions. The Solid Fuel Ignition and Extinction - Material Ignition and Suppression Test (SoFIE - MIST) study focuses on understanding the flammability of materials that could be used in future space missions. The equipment and procedures to detect and suppress a fire and to clean up afterward are also essential for crew safety. What we learn also could provide better understanding of fire safety and improve methods for testing material for homes, offices, aircraft, and other uses on Earth.

Immunity Assay: Studies have shown that microgravity weakens the immune system. Monitoring and maintaining human health are vital prerequisites for mission success. Immunity Assay aims to develop a new research tool to study the impact of spaceflight stressors, like microgravity and radiation, on cellular immune functions. Researchers are doing this by developing a new way to monitor health and immune functions in a blood sample. The outcome of this investigation could provide a handy tool for direct immune system monitoring on the space station, as well as on Earth.

Engineered Heart Tissues-2: This ISS National Lab-sponsored study continues work with 3D-cultured cardiac muscle tissue to assess human cardiac function in microgravity. Previous work with 3D cultures in space detected changes at the cellular and tissue level that could provide early indication of the development of cardiac disease. Engineered Heart Tissues-2 tests whether new therapies prevent these negative effects from occurring. A small magnet embedded into a flexible post is attached to each cardiac tissue. The contractile motion of the tissues moves the magnet. A sensor records real-time contractile function of the tissues by tracking the magnet's movement.

External Microorganisms Study: Scientists need to identify the microorganisms that may be transported with crew members during deep space exploration. That way researchers can better know what contaminants might be brought along, and which are native to the other planetary bodies. The ISS External Microorganisms study takes on this challenge by having astronauts collect samples from outside the space station to examine whether a spacecraft releases microorganisms and, if so, how many and how far they may travel. Results could inform preparations for future human exploration missions to the Moon and Mars.

Student-Built Ball Clamp Monopod: Manufactured by students, the High Schools United with NASA to Create Hardware (HUNCH) Ball Clamp Monopod is attempting to address astronaut comments on the difficulty of positioning video or still cameras in the middle of a module. NASA's HUNCH program enables students to fabricate real-world products for NASA as they apply their science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills. The project is composed of an aluminum monopod fitted with a camera shoe and ball clamp so it can be attached to a standard space station handrail. This serves as a pivoting platform for photography and video. Students from Dade Middle School, Cy-Woods High School, and Conroe High School in the Houston, Texas, area worked to manufacture and produce the hardware and will be given pictures and videos of the hardware evaluation.

EVA data

  Name Start End Duration Mission Airlock Suit
EVA Prokopyev, Sergei 19.04.2023, 01:40 UTC 19.04.2023, 09:35 UTC 7h 55m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 5
EVA Petelin, Dmitri 19.04.2023, 01:40 UTC 19.04.2023, 09:35 UTC 7h 55m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 4
 
EVA Bowen, Stephen 28.04.2023, 13:11 UTC 28.04.2023, 20:12 UTC 7h 01m ISS-69 ISS - Quest EMU No. 3009
EVA Al Neyadi, Sultan 28.04.2023, 13:11 UTC 28.04.2023, 20:12 UTC 7h 01m ISS-69 ISS - Quest EMU No. 3013
 
EVA Prokopyev, Sergei 03.05.2023, 20:00 UTC 04.05.2023, 03:11 UTC 7h 11m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 5
EVA Petelin, Dmitri 03.05.2023, 20:00 UTC 04.05.2023, 03:11 UTC 7h 11m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 4
 
EVA Prokopyev, Sergei 12.05.2023, 15:47 UTC 12.05.2023, 21:01 UTC 5h 14m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 5
EVA Petelin, Dmitri 12.05.2023, 15:47 UTC 12.05.2023, 21:01 UTC 5h 14m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 4
 
EVA Bowen, Stephen 09.06.2023, 13:25 UTC 09.06.2023, 19:28 UTC 6h 03m ISS-69 ISS - Quest EMU No. 3013
EVA Hoburg, Warren 09.06.2023, 13:25 UTC 09.06.2023, 19:28 UTC 6h 03m ISS-69 ISS - Quest EMU No. 3004
 
EVA Bowen, Stephen 15.06.2023, 12:42 UTC 15.06.2023, 18:17 UTC 5h 35m ISS-69 ISS - Quest EMU No. 3013
EVA Hoburg, Warren 15.06.2023, 12:42 UTC 15.06.2023, 18:17 UTC 5h 35m ISS-69 ISS - Quest EMU No. 3004
 
EVA Prokopyev, Sergei 22.06.2023, 14:24 UTC 22.06.2023, 20:48 UTC 6h 24m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 5
EVA Petelin, Dmitri 22.06.2023, 14:24 UTC 22.06.2023, 20:48 UTC 6h 24m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 4
 
EVA Prokopyev, Sergei 09.08.2023, 14:44 UTC 09.08.2023, 21:19 UTC 6h 35m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 5
EVA Petelin, Dmitri 09.08.2023, 14:44 UTC 09.08.2023, 21:19 UTC 6h 35m ISS-69 ISS - Poisk Orlan-MKS No. 4
 

Relocations of Manned Spacecrafts

Spacecraft from Undocking Time UTC to Redocking Time UTC
Soyuz MS-23 ISS - Poisk 06.04.2023 08:44:55 ISS - Prichal 06.04.2023 09:21:44
 
SpaceX Crew-6 ISS - Harmony PMA 3 06.05.2023 11:23 ISS - Harmony PMA 2 06.05.2023 12:01
 

Photos / Graphics

China Soyuz MS-23 relocation
Soyuz MS-23 relocation EVA preparations
EVA Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin on April 19, 2023 Cygnus NG-18 departure
EVA Stephen Bowen on April 28, 2023 EVA Sergei Prokopyev on May 03, 2023
Soyuz MS-23 EVA Sergei Prokopyev and Dmitri Petelin on May 12, 2023
Crews ISS-69 and Ax-2 EVA Stephen Bowen on June 09, 2023
EVA Warren Hoburg on June 09, 2023 Cygnus NG-19 capture
EVA Sergei Prokopyev on August 09, 2023

more Earth observation photos

more EVA photos

more onboard photos


©      

Last update on November 11, 2023.

SPACEFACTS patch